Spice Up Your Writing With Similes and Metaphors

Metaphors and similes are two different types of figurative language, meaning that they are phrases writers use to emphasize points without speaking directly about the facts. Figurative language is not literal and is used to demonstrate or emphasize a writer’s point. Similes are very different from metaphors, but the two are often grouped together because…

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How to Use Apostrophes

In written English, the way we generally express possession is by adding an apostrophe and an “s” to a noun. Thus, the bicycle that belongs to Rico would be “Rico’s bicycle.” If Tammy has a new boyfriend named Mitch, then Mitch would be “Tammy’s boyfriend.” Possession is to be understood broadly, not limited to physical…

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Rules for English Language Capitalization

Knowing when to capitalize a word and when to leave it lowercased can be tricky because there are many different rules about when to use capital letters. Here are brief explanations about general capitalization rules to help you figure out when you need a capital letter. First word of a sentence – The first word…

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Commonly Confused Words

Misusing similar sounding or similarly spelled words is one of the most common writing mistakes made, and not understanding the differences can significantly impact your grades or credibility in written communication. The following is a list of the most common word choice errors that are often confused in writing and tips for how to use…

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Press Release 101

The press release is often the most direct and cost-effective way to present your service, product, event, or business in general to any relevant audience. Though many variations exist, the basic pattern is both elegant and easy to compose. And for our purposes, the simplest way to organize your statement will involve answering a set…

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Subject and Verb Agreement

admin      Grammar Rules

When you compose a sentence, your subjects and verbs must agree. This means that you must use the correct verb form that matches the number of objects in your subjects. A singular subject, such as the dog must have a singular verb, such as eats to create the dog eats. Mostly, these types of errors…

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